WOOD CONE SPEAKERS by JVC

 
Advanced Features Life with Wood Cone Speakers Development Story

Development Story

A Dream and a Challenge

To recreate the sound of instruments played in a concert hall, speakers should be designed as though they were actual musical instruments. In particular, the speaker diaphragms ought to be made of wood — the same material used for making violins, cellos, and other instruments. This was the engineering dream that first got the ball rolling at JVC.

First Prototype First Prototype (Made of Fan-Shaped Wood Sheets Pasted Together)

There was, however, one significant barrier to the development of a wooden diaphragm — stamping. Wood easily cracks and can even break entirely when stamped. JVC engineers tried all sorts of techniques to solve this problem, including boiling the wood sheets and soaking them in water. Nothing seemed to work.

Cracking Curling
Cracking
 
Curling

A Surprising Solution

A Surprising Solution
 
Dried Squid
(VERY CHEWY!)
Japanese Rice Wine

Many years into the search for an answer to the stamping problem, a solution was finally hit upon. It happened that one of JVC's engineers visited a Japanese pub after work, and he was regularly served a dish of soft squid (a fairly common snack in such pubs). How, he wondered, was this typically hard and rather rubbery food softened? A little research led him to discover that squid is softened when it is soaked in sake, or Japanese rice wine, overnight. Putting two and two together, the engineer and his fellow researchers soon discovered that sake could do the same thing for wood — when soaked in sake, a wood sheet becomes soft and pliable enough to undergo the stamping process without breaking or cracking.

Extensive testing yielded another discovery — birch, and particularly the densest, firmest part of the core, offered the optimum set of acoustic characteristics. The utmost care is taken to manage temperature and pressure during repeated stamping processes, and the use of special thermosetting resin allows the wood diaphragm to retain its shape over time, thus completing the intricate wood cone production process.

Wood Cone Speaker Production Process
Wood Cone Speaker Production Process

Optimising the Wood Cone Sound

To fully exploit the wooden diaphragm's superior acoustic characteristics, JVC paid rigorous attention to every detail of the compact component system. The speaker system is carefully finished with a range of high-grade components and comes with a real cherrywood enclosure.

Optimising the Wood Cone Sound

Superior speaker driveability and high-fidelity sound are ensured by the JVC-exclusive Hybrid Feedback Digital Amplifier. The centre unit also features special internal construction and carefully selected premium parts and devices, which contribute to the system's astounding sound quality.

Optimising the Wood Cone Sound

Collaboration with Sound-Creating Professionals

JVC collaborated with studio engineers from the Tokyo Aoyama Recording Studio, a JVC affiliate, in the final sound-tuning stage of EX-series systems. The joint effort was aimed at achieving JVC's ultimate goal in developing the units — sound reproduction that comes as close as possible to what musicians and composers originally intended.

The studio engineers also provided valuable input regarding the selection of parts and materials for the centre unit, and the most appropriate layout.

Tokyo Aoyama Recording Studio

Tokyo Aoyama Recording Studio






This history-making JVC innovation will give you a virtual front-row orchestra seat, with the musicians performing right in front of you — so close you can almost see the movements of their fingers

Collaboration with Sound-Creating Professionals
The World's First Wood Cone Speaker Compact System - The EX-A1
The World's First Wood Cone Speaker Compact System — The EX-A1
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